Home Food For Many Black Families, New Year’s Greens and Black-Eyed Peas Fill the...

For Many Black Families, New Year’s Greens and Black-Eyed Peas Fill the Belly and the Soul

 “It’s a spiritual moment,” said Layla Sewell, right, of cooking her ancestors’ recipes with her children.    (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)
“It’s a spiritual moment,” said Layla Sewell, right, of cooking her ancestors’ recipes with her children. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

New Year is a time of joy for most as it sentimentally presents an opportunity to start a new chapter free of baggage. For different cultures, the traditions are as diverse as they come. For as many black families, especially in the South, the black-eyed peas as well as the greens nourish both the body and the soul.

“It is a spiritual moment because it’s a direct connection to my ancestors that I knew and a representation of the ancestors I didn’t know who were before me,” Sewell said (Jennings, 2020).

Back in the day, the adoption of these meals back in the day was out of necessity and resourcefulness. Today, the belief is of good fortunes and good luck. The symbolism of the New Year’s lucky food ripples across all members of society fosters heritage and posterity.

Read more by  Angel Jennings at Los Angeles Times

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