Home Events + Community Social Justice and Advocacy: How One Person is Making a Difference

Social Justice and Advocacy: How One Person is Making a Difference

Social justice is the idea of a justified distribution of resources among individuals in a society. It’s about rights, humanity, equality and equity. It can be measured in different ways like socioeconomics, social privileges, education, institutional, and other societal opportunities that are spread across a society.

Whether or not individuals have managed to fulfill their roles in society is one parameter used to measure the success of social justice. For instance, a community where a few individuals are very well-off, whereas the prevalent population is poor, the social justice in such society is regarded or considered to have failed.

Social justice advocates work to find ways to change the way things are and help those that are maligned. Some of these advocates work in entertainment, law, public service, and some in the field of education.

Takes Los Angeles-based educator, game-maker, and activist engaged in social justice issues, Kesa Kivel.

Photo Credit courtesy of Kesa Kivel

Ms. Kivel developed the free “Road to Racial Justice” game over a three-year period with the help of a focus group comprised of individuals of various races and ethnicities. She is committed to sharing the game widely at no cost in order to promote racial justice, and she recognizes that the privileges that she has acquired because of her whiteness have made this possible. Her board game is just one way to combat racism.

Photo Credit courtesy of Kesa Kivel

Racism is a contentious issue. People of color feel neglected when it comes to the opportunities available to them, which includes unfair schooling opportunities, biases in job opportunities, and many more forms of prejudices. Cases of police brutality against the Black community continue to be on the rise where victims have cited unreasonable application of the law against them.

Social Justice advocates, like Ms.Kivel, are rolling up their sleeves and using their skillset to help in whatever way they can to help fight racism. The free “Road to Racial Justice” board game is just one of the ways. Through critical thinking, this board game is helping address racism and white privilege. Players will become more aware that racism exists in many everyday situations (interpersonal and institutional), learn why the situations are racist (stereotyping, tokenism, cultural appropriation, etc.), and acquire tools to interrupt these kinds of situations.

Photo Credit courtesy of Kesa Kivel

Ms. Kivel suggests this board game is for ages 13+ (Teens and Adults) and is a CCSS-Aligned Curriculum. Based on social analysis, and team-based discussion, it is perfect for classrooms, staff trainings, community groups, and family game nights.

Racism needs to be stopped and it requires we step up and fight for social justice. Head to Ms.Kivel’s site and see the amazing work she is doing to support and encourage cross-cultural understanding and compassionate actions in order to help create a more loving and just world.

- Advertisment -

Most Popular

#EndSARS: Nigerian movement makes its way to the U.S.

Tonight at 6 p.m., a candlelight vigil will be held in Los Angeles  to honor the #EndSARS movement in Nigeria. The protest will occur...

Why you should still care about COVID-19

Watching others lack empathy and understanding can feel like a knife to the heart. Maskless folks inspire feelings of dread and anger. America’s challenge...

Department of Justice files antitrust suit against Google

This morning, the Department of Justice, supported by 11 state attorneys general, sued Google for violating antitrust laws. https://twitter.com/TheJusticeDept/status/1318575015428825095 The complaint aims to stop Google from...

How to have a COVID-19-safe Halloween

Earlier last month, there were concerns about Los Angeles cancelling trick-or-treating on Halloween. The county quickly reversed the decision, though Beverly Hills’ ban remains....

Registration

Forgotten Password?